Recent snapchattery

Getting tired of recruiting—everyone submit stuff.

Getting tired of recruiting—everyone submit stuff.

Ms. Harm Reduction explains how to herpes and work.

checkingoftheprivilege:

[TW: slut-shaming, trans-hate]

She is Swedish. If you really cared about sex workers esp. trans and non-binary sex workers of color you would boycott ALL things Swedish and Norwegian. By lapping up Swedish music you ARE contributing to the oppression of sex workers in Sweden who must face the…

Is this a parody blog? I’m honestly not sure.Some of it seems excessive but some of the points are valid (e.g. the use of the academic term “phallocentrist” is transphobic.)  And if it isn’t, it’s sweet that someone is so adamant an ally that they want to boycott an entire nation b/c of its misguided policy, but uh, boycotting all things Swedish means also boycotting the Rose Alliance?

Also, then all things American would be ripe for boycott.

And now I feel irrationally guilty for listening to Lykke Li.

Omg, now someone’s going to inform me it’s OBVIOUSLY a parody blog.

"…[I]n the cases of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum, as in the case of Daniel Holtzclaw and his alleged victims, the idea of sex work as an important factor in the crime continues to be obscured by other supposedly more important issues, watered down to nothing in order to be considered palatable to sensitive audiences. The few conversations I’ve seen on Twitter, Tumblr, and the occasional news articles and blogs focus only on the collective (non)reactions of people when a Black woman is the victim of violent crime. I do not want to take anything away from that analysis. I know it’s absolutely true: Black women are the least and the last in line for anger, rage, justice, pity, sympathy, and empathy…

…Black women are upset, we are incredibly sad, we are begging to be cared for, and we have a right to feel this way. We are completely correct in our steadfast refusal to simply disappear into the ether when we are violated, when our lives are snuffed out. We are justified in our anguish and in our anger. We are righteous in this, and I am not here to take away from it. I am here standing with my sisters and speaking out too. We are the most spotless of lambs, sinless in our desire to simply be seen as just as important as anyone else. But, what I am also here to say is this: in the midst of the tangible and thickening silence from what could arguably be called one of the most vocal corners of twitter, Black Feminist Twitter, and even Feminist Twitter as a whole; in the midst of the silence from virtually everyone and everywhere: where is the outrage for two teenage girls who were brutally murdered? Is the outrage lacking because of their race? Definitely. Is it non-existent because of their reported interactions with law enforcement? Absolutely. But it is also lacking because they were reported as working as exotic dancers. This cannot be denied. It is unfair and unethical to say anything different.

…We cannot, while decrying violence against Black women and confessing our desire to be seen, heard, and cared for; deny both the intersection of Black womanhood and sex work as a blind spot and the incredible violence Black sex workers face. There comes a point where we must be willing, if we are able, to speak out against the erasure and shame that is so often laid on Black women who also work in the sex trades. We must be willing to consistently speak out about the casual shaming and stigma that is so often attached to our existence.

In the midst of writings that throw away the reality of our lives by saying, “It is difficult to determine [why there is no outrage regarding Tjhisha and Angelia],” this task can seem overwhelming. It can be too much to, once again, find yourself erased, consciously ignored, and pushed aside. It can be more than you ever thought you’d be able to take, dealing with the violence levied on sex workers—Black women who are sex workers in particular—by media, bloggers, celebrities, and the public alike. Because it is violence, in a way. It is a violent choice to casually exact things like erasure, stigma, and shaming on people who are already erased, shamed, and stigmatized every day of their lives for something as mundane as simply going to work. It is a form of violence to yell out, “Pay attention to these girls,” while simultaneously harshly erasing them from the conversation. It is violence to use the deaths of Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum as a way to insert oneself into the forefront of a conversation while refusing to acknowledge the young women at all.

Because here is the truth: Ball and Mangum hadn’t reached their 20th birthdays. They came from poorer families. They obviously, judging only from the photos of them that have popped up online, enjoyed their lives–to some extent, at least. They were beautiful Black girls. They were beautiful young girls. They had entire worlds and lifetimes ahead of them. Tjhisha and Angelia were brutally murdered and still, over a week later, not many even know about it. Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum were important, lovely human beings who also worked as strippers.

Acknowledging their work and the violence many full service sex workers and exotic dancers face is not inappropriate. Realizing and admitting the facts is not untoward: Whatever labels we use, strippers; dancers; escorts; street workers; and many other sex workers are required to accept and deal with the high probability of being victimized both during and because of their work. This is life and they live with it every day. They must watch over their shoulders, carry weapons of self defense, and even create plan upon plan upon contingency plan just to arrive home safely at the end of a work day. Beyond that, many working in the sex trades, regardless of job description, must accept that this—the erasure that has happened to Tjhisha and Angelia—may also happen to them if they are the victims of violent crime. For Black women, that acceptance and the weight of it is doubly hard."

peechingtonmariejust in her magnificent  ”More Than Silence: Tjisha Ball, Angelia Mangum, and the Erasure of Black Sex Workers” on Tits and Sass today

peechingtonmariejust talks about how the coverage on ‪#‎TjishaAndAngelia‬ ignores that both misogynoir AND whorephobia no doubt played a part in the violence against them, and calls on the mainstream media to stop erasing Black sex workers. 

thestripperhatesyou:

marginalutilite:

Another day in escort life

WHY DID YOU NOT E-MAIL THIS WORK OF ART TO ME

Just gotta tell everyone like I told thestripperhatesyou that his reply was a chastened “ok ;(“, which I found somehow satisfying. Her theory is that he was “just testing the dick vid waters.” 

Also, she watched the video, though I didn’t, and she reports that his dick is perfectly proportionate to his head, so he is a literal dickhead.

Plus:
“The thing is, this guy’s dick is exactly the same color as his bald head. So, where he has the camera, at times his dick moves in front of his face and they’re literally interchangeable.”

I know you all wanted to know, right?

thestripperhatesyou:

marginalutilite:

Another day in escort life

WHY DID YOU NOT E-MAIL THIS WORK OF ART TO ME

Just gotta tell everyone like I told thestripperhatesyou that his reply was a chastened “ok ;(“, which I found somehow satisfying. Her theory is that he was “just testing the dick vid waters.” Also, she watched the video, though I didn’t, and she reports that his dick is perfectly proportionate to his head, so he is a literal dickhead. Plus: “The thing is, this guy’s dick is exactly the same color as his bald head. So, where he has the camera, at times his dick moves in front of his face and they’re literally interchangeable.” I know you all wanted to know, right?

clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead:

toastyslayingbutter:

girlisariot:

Radical feminists can talk about how evil the sex industry is, but we need to have an exit strategy for sex workers.

Or at least support those who already have exit strategy ideas.

How would an exit strategy work exactly? Like an all-encompassing…

What gets me is how obviously little she knows about the sex industry.

Like she doesn’t have a CLUE what she’s talkin about but she’s not gonna let that stop her. Why should she?

And policy makers rarely engage actual sex workers even though when they do, it works. It works!

If they spoke about shipping off any other sort of worker to labor on marijuana farms, it’d easily be recognizable as…trafficking

Another day in escort life

Another day in escort life

I’m gonna do this jobhaver style and ask the internet to remind me to dye my hair in the next 24 hours.

Recent snapchattery

peechingtonmariejust:

Keeping you updated on Tjhisha Ball and Angelia Mangum’s fundraiser http://www.youcaring.com/memorial-fundraiser/help-angelia-and-tjhisha-s-family/238511

niaking:

"Miss Major is a black, formerly incarcerated, transgender elder. She has been an activist and advocate in her community for over forty years.  She was at the Stonewall uprising in 1969, became politicized at Attica, was an original member of the first all-transgender gospel choir, and is a father, mother, grandmother, and grandfather to her own children, and to many in the transgender community.


Currently, Miss Major is the Executive Director of TGI Justice where she instills hope and a belief in a better future to the girls that are currently incarcerated and those coming home.” - from the Transgender/Intersex Justice Project website

Every queer person of my generation owes Miss Major a debt of gratitude. She needs us right now.

"This past week Miss Major’s apartment caught fire and almost all of her personal belongings were severely damaged. Thankfully, she and her pooch Moose were unharmed. She is currently looking for a new place to live, and once she is able to re-establish permanent housing, she’s going to need support to refurnish her home in addition to simply covering her monthly bills, health costs, etc.

Please help by inviting your friends and networks to join this circle, increasing your monthly donation, or making an additional one-time donation. Because we take care of our own.”

More info on how to support here.

(via evolvingmatter)

"The privilege of my origin shows through in my writing, which is the product of my education. I inherited my skill at writing through the educational opportunities my middle class background afforded me; I learned it, but I did not earn it. Because of that skill I have been able to write for top-level publications in the UK, writing some explicitly pro-sex work and pro-kink pieces for them. Unfortunately, I have made some mistakes in my writing. The first piece I wrote for the Guardian referred to some sex workers as “miserable slaves”, because in my advocacy for the understanding that sex work is work, I was trying to inoculate my argument against people’s likely criticisms. In doing so, I bought right into the trafficking myth. Months later, I came across some criticism of the piece. I engaged with it, apologizing and putting myself through a crash course on the rescue industry; this study resulted in the first piece I wrote about sex work which I feel is truly worthy. Through my embarrassment, I realized that I needed to completely reeducate myself. The reputation of the “social justice warriors” on the internet is fearsome, but I have tried to approach feedback with a sense of humility, and a few of the most vocal activists have graciously offered me their support.

With my unearned platform, I have an opportunity to carry the message of sex worker rights to policymakers. I am duty-bound to do my best to get up to speed with the voices of the most marginalized among us, while not using my privilege to insist that others educate me. As I prepare to write a big article about the sex worker rights movement, aimed at those who have heard little of it, I’m frightened of making a mistake, of making things worse for us. When I’m speaking to an audience of non-sex workers, my choice of message and the way I deliver it must avoid reinforcing the assumptions and stereotypes that marginalize us, and my politics must not pander to the social forces that criminalize us. If I can’t do that reliably, I might as well say nothing."

— Margaret Corvid in “Still Learning: On Writing As A Privileged Sex Worker" at Tits and Sass today

Margaret Corvid on her responsibility to create space for the voices of the marginalized as a privileged sex worker writer.